Why we go

We are a group of Kiwis who have lived and worked in Central Asia, or been fully involved with helping others go and unveil God's glory there. If you have a heart to go to Central Asia and skills to offer, we can help you get there. Quickly. With a local team to help you when you’re on the ground. So you have maximum impact.

Why we go

Central Asia is home to around 2,500 people who have come to appreciate that the Lord Jesus is Lord and Saviour. Yet half a billion more people live in that vast, dry region. It is one of the great unreached places of the world. We work in teams to unveil His glory to those people by gently and clearly explaining Jesus Christ is Lord, helping believers form into functioning, encouraging churches, and training leaders to multiply.

How we go

In the midst of political change, great uncertainty and moral darkness the people of Central Asia need to experience the only true hope and joy found in Jesus who is the Light of the World. Our people form up in teams, learn their language and culture, come alongside them in development projects, business or service jobs, and unveil His glory from Scripture and by their lives.

Here's how you can go

There are opportunities for people like you to work and serve in Central Asia. Both as long term residents or on short visits. We can help as you prepare to go and we have experienced people on the ground who will support you when you are there.

Join a team of native English speakers and be the friendly, foreign experts running a short conversational English programme for enthusiastic Kazakh university.

Go with a team to meet the Hui people in NE China and PRAY that God's glory will be unveiled among them.

This is ancient Central Asia ... and it's BURSTING with modern opportunities

From earliest times Central Asia has been the scene of invasions, struggles for empire, inter-tribal warfare and international commerce. Home for Turkic tribes, the vast region was once part of the Persian Empire. It has been conquered by Macedonians, Arabs, Genghis Khan and his Mongols and, from the 1800s, Russians. When the Soviet Union collapsed, Muslim republics emerged from the rubble. They have an Islamic identity, though it is not always strong and is frequently mixed with traditional folk religion. These new nations wrestle with daunting challenges as they make up for decades lost to oppression, exploitation or war.